TCORS 2.0: Center for the Assessment of Tobacco Regulations (CAsToR)

News

CAsToR e-Announcements (November 2022)
POSTED: Fri Nov 18, 2022
A bi-monthly e-newsletter of CAsToR highlights, events and more. Headlines: CAsToR is pleased to host former Director of the Center for Tobacco Products under the Food and Drug Administration, Mr. Mitch Zeller, Thursday, September 29, 2022; Dr. David Mendez was featured in USA TODAY, August 3, 2022, discussing the impact of menthol cigarettes on the Black population.; Longitudinal Associations Between Exclusive and Dual Use of Electronic Nicotine Delivery Systems and Cigarettes and Self-Reported Incident Diagnosed Cardiovascular Disease Among Adults  
Read the CAsToR e-Announcements (November 2022)
CAsToR e-Announcements (September 2022)
POSTED: Fri Sep 09, 2022
A bi-monthly e-newsletter of CAsToR highlights, events and more. Headlines: CAsToR is pleased to host former Director of the Center for Tobacco Products under the Food and Drug Administration, Mr. Mitch Zeller, Thursday, September 29, 2022; Dr. David Mendez was featured in USA TODAY, August 3, 2022, discussing the impact of menthol cigarettes on the Black population.; Longitudinal Associations Between Exclusive and Dual Use of Electronic Nicotine Delivery Systems and Cigarettes and Self-Reported Incident Diagnosed Cardiovascular Disease Among Adults  
Read the CAsToR e-Announcements (September 2022)

Selected news

“Targeted menthol cigarette ads helped lead to high Black usage. Should they be banned?”
David Mendez, PhD
POSTED: Mon Aug 08, 2022
David Mendez, a lead author of the Michigan study and a health management and policy professor at the university, said menthol cigarettes reduce the irritation and harshness of smoking through their smooth, minty flavor profile. Because the cigarette user does not cough or feel the less healthy aspects of smoking, they are less inclined to quit, he said. Menthol also works with nicotine to enhance nicotine's addictive effects. Banning menthol will save thousands of lives, Mendez said. “This is the closest we have been,“ Mendez said of the proposed prohibition.
Read the full story at Yahoo! News
CAsToR investigators Meza and Mendez write for the Conversation about the reasons for FDA to pursue a cigarette menthol ban
Rafael Meza, PhD and David Mendez, PhD
POSTED: Wed May 18, 2022
The FDA has opened the public comment period for the agency’s proposed ban on menthol cigarettes. Epidemiology and global health professor Rafael Meza studies data modeling in disease prevention and cancer risk. David Mendez, who studies smoking cessation and tobacco control policies, is an associate professor of health management and policy. These University of Michigan researchers found that, in a 38-year period, African Americans suffered most of the harmful effects of menthol cigarettes. Now the researchers have developed a model to simulate the possible benefits of the menthol ban, based on studies of population trends in tobacco use. As experts on the behavioral and public health aspects of smoking, they explain the role of menthol in smoking-related illness and death.
Read the full story at The Conversation
CAsToR investigator Cliff Douglas discusses the proposed FDA menthol ban in MedPage
Clifford E. Douglas, JD
POSTED: Tue May 03, 2022
“The premature demand that menthol be banned in all tobacco products, if implemented, risks handing almost the entire tobacco marketplace over to cigarettes, which kill half of long-term users. Science has demonstrated that a variety of noncombustible products offer reduced-risk alternatives for adult smokers who are either unable or unwilling to quit using nicotine completely. These range from e-cigarettes and oral nicotine lozenges and pouches to such products as a very low-nitrosamine smokeless tobacco called snus. Research to date suggests that retaining menthol in some or perhaps all of them could help adults quit smoking.” — Clifford E. Douglas, JD (Director, Tobacco Research Network; Faculty, University of Michigan School of Public Health)
Read the full story at MedPage Today
CAsToR e-Announcements (April 2022)
POSTED: Mon May 02, 2022
A bi-monthly e-newsletter of CAsToR highlights, events and more. Headlines: Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco Annual Meeting; Dr. Le promoted to Assistant Research Scientist; Delvon Mattingly receives the 2022 Harburg Student Award for Excellence in Social Epidemiology; Dr. Nancy Fleischer and researchers created a new interactive tool housing US data on Tobacco 21 (T21) laws; Recent publications, events and opportunities.  
Read the CAsToR e-Announcements (April 2021)
Congratulations! CaSToR Trainee Delvon Mattingly awarded Harburg Student Award for Excellence in Social Epidemiology
Delvon Mattingly
POSTED: Wed Apr 20, 2022
University of Michigan Doctoral Student and CaSToR Trainee Delvon Mattingly has been awarded the Harburg Student Award for Excellence in Social Epidemiology by the Center for Social Epidemiology and Population Health (CSEPH) at the University of Michigan. The award is in recognition of his paper “Change in Distress About Police Brutality and Substance Use Among Young People, 2017-2020.” Each year the Harburg Award recognizes one MPH student and one PhD student who displays outstanding promise in the study of the social and psychosocial determinants of health. The award recognizes student work that seeks to integrate and understand the links between social determinants, psychological processes, behaviors and biology in health research.  
Read Delvon’s paper
Michigan Public Health database serves as resource for researchers on Tobacco 21 laws
POSTED: Fri Apr 15, 2022
Researchers can now utilize a new interactive tool housing US data on Tobacco 21 (T21) laws—regulations that raise the minimum age of the sale of tobacco products to 21. Nancy Fleischer, associate professor of Epidemiology at the University of Michigan School of Public Health, worked on the database and highlights that data collected for this tool can be used by researchers to further study the effects and public health impact of T21 policies.  
We created this database to estimate the proportion of the US population covered by T21 laws over time. Other researchers can now link these data to other data sources, as we did recently in a paper examining the impact of T21 laws on youth smoking initiation.
Read the full story at Michigan Public Health News Center